additional bone broth notes . . .

by mulberryshoots

bone broth . . .

bone broth . . .

Okay, so I just opened up the Instant Pot and peered into the soup to see if it was cooked sufficiently. The beef was falling off the bone so I am now able to confirm that 75 minutes pressure cooked is long enough. There was a layer of fat on top when I took this photo.

I then began to rummage around the stock to see how the bones fared. And it suddenly struck me that bone marrow – such an English delicacy that antique marrow spoons were made to enjoy it – was still left in the bones! So I fished them all out and decided to harvest the beef and the marrow before discarding the bones. Unlike some broths made on the stove – like chicken – the beef was tender and not tough, and also still had some taste. I’m going to think about what to do with the harvested marrow and beef later on – and will freeze them for now.bone-broth-2

After the broth cools enough for me to pour it through a sieve, I’ll then divide it into quart soup containers and put them in the freezer – the fat should rise to the top to be skimmed off before heating it up and drinking it on my first mini-fast day. Cheers!

Postscript: Just realized that with all the hoopla and marketing for this “21-day diet that will change your life by mini-fasting 2X a week on homemade bone broth” that it’s ONLY SIX TIMES that one is drinking bone broth instead of eating during those three weeks!

So depending upon how much each serving you drink, 6 X a day, you’ll probably be making bone broth 3-4 times altogether. After the 21 day diet, I do plan to continue with more beef bones/ribs that I have in the freezer. Just wanted to give readers some sense of scale of this whole thing.

The biggest lesson learned of all that I experienced with all this activity is that the Instant Pot is an absolutely great cooking machine, once I figured out how to turn it ON using the manual button rather than pre-programmed ones!

It’s made of high quality material with a substantial stainless cooking pot. It’s quiet, it’s safe to use and it works FAST relatively speaking. I’m planning to try it out to make a veal ragu to serve with pappardelle noodles for a piano party we’re having in mid-October. And maybe Irish oatmeal in the mornings that usually takes half an hour on the stove when the weather gets colder.